Using radiology to treat patients

In Calgary, our interventional radiologists use medical imaging to perform minimally-invasive procedures that treat conditions like an enlarged prostate or uterine fibroids. Certain procedures are performed by Mayfair radiologists at Mayfair Diagnostics’ clinics while others are peformed in hospitals.

HOW DOES IT WORK?

Interventional radiology (IR) involves the use of small catheter tubes and wires, or small needles, to precisely target areas of concern. This is sometimes called a pinhole procedure and can be an alternative to open and laparoscopic surgery. IR can reduce risks of complications, provide shorter hospital stays, and enable quicker convalescence and return to work, compared to open surgery.

In-hospital IR procedures are performed after a consultation with Mayfair’s IR radiologists. After a physician or specialist sends us a consultation request, we work closely with specialists, referring physicians, and patients to determine what procedure is best suited to each patient’s medical history.

PROCEDURES

Breast and thyroid biopsies examine a specific area of the breast or thyroid for abnormalities. A needle is used to take a small tissue sample, which is then sent to a laboratory for analysis. These procedures are performed in Mayfair Diagnostics clinics.

Image-guided pain therapy uses X-ray and ultrasound to guide treatment for chronic pain by allowing Mayfair physicians to precisely inject medication through a small needle, or perform treatment on soft tissues. These procedures are performed in Mayfair Diagnostics clinics.

Prostate artery embolization (PAE) shrinks an enlarged prostate by non-surgically blocking the arteries that feed the gland. In a hospital setting, an interventional radiologist uses X-ray guidance to move a small plastic tube into the small arteries which are feeding the prostate and inject tiny plastic particles to block them and starve the prostate of its blood supply, shrinking it. Read this article to learn how PAE compares to a common surgical option.

Uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) is a minimally invasive procedure used to block blood flow to fibroid tumors of the uterus. Fibroids are muscular tumors of varying sizes that grow in the wall of the uterus. In a hospital setting, an interventional radiologist uses X-ray guidance to move a small plastic tube into the small arteries which are feeding the fibroids. Then tiny plastic particles are injected into the arteries to starve the fibroid of its blood supply, shrinking it.

Our Interventional Radiologists

At Mayfair Diagnostics, our IR specialists are leaders in their field with extensive training in a variety of cutting-edge IR procedures. They work closely with general practitioners and specialists to provide multidisciplinary care and ensure better patient outcomes.

Oliver T. Halliwell

Dr. Halliwell has been with Mayfair since 2006. Areas of specialization include interventional radiology, vascular imaging and body imaging. View

Ani Mirakhur

Dr. Mirakhur has been with Mayfair since 2016 and has a sub-specialty practice in vascular and interventional radiology. View

Michael M. Welsh

Dr. Welsh has been with Mayfair since 1990 and has a sub-specialty in interventional radiology. View

Richard J. Cormack

Dr. Cormack has been with Mayfair since 2014 and has a sub-specialty in interventional radiology. View

Darshan Bakshi

Dr. Bakshi has been with Mayfair since 2008 and has a sub-specialty in vascular and interventional radiology. View

THE KNOWLEDGE CENTRE

 

Your physician or specialist will need to send a consultation request to Mayfair's IR radiologists in order to determine the appropriateness of the IR procedure to address your concern.

We work closely with specialists, referring physicians, and patients to determine what procedure is best suited to each patient’s medical history. Below you will find answers to some frequently asked questions about Interventional Radiology.  

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Is an IR procedure appropriate for me?

Your personal medical history will determine whether or not an IR procedure is appropriate for you, such as how long you’ve had symptoms, how they affect your daily activities, and whether you’ve seen a specialist and what they recommend. In determining appropriateness, there are a number of questions you could discuss with your doctor. What are your treatment options? What outcomes could be expected for each option? What are the risks? What kind of recovery time is needed for each option?

What happens during an IR procedure?

IR involves the use of small catheter tubes and wires, or small needles, to precisely target areas of concern. This usually involves an interventional radiologist using X-ray guidance to move a small plastic tube into small arteries which are feeding the area of concern and injecting tiny plastic particles to block them and starve the area of its blood supply, shrinking it. IR procedures are minimally invasive and can be an alternative to open and laparoscopic surgery due to lower risk of complications, shorter hospital stays, and quicker convalescence and return to work.

What are the risks of an IR procedure?

Compared to open or laparoscopic surgery options, IR can reduce risks of complications, provide shorter hospital stays, and enable quicker convalescence and return to work. During an embolization procedure, the area of concern is slowly deprived of its blood supply so it may take up to six months for you to see the full benefit, although you should start to feel better after a week. There is also a chance that the interventional radiologist will not be able to position the catheter adequately to block blood flow or the injection particles do not go into the correct area. Other general risks include infection, allergic reaction, bleeding, pain, etc. The specific risks for each procedure will be outlined during the consultation process.

How can I get an IR procedure?

IR procedures are performed in hospital after a consultation with Mayfair’s IR radiologists. After a GP or specialist sends us a consultation request, we work closely with specialists, referring physicians, and patients to determine what procedure is best suited to each patient’s medical history. Once a procedure has been chosen as the best next course of action, it may be performed at one of three Calgary hospitals: Peter Lougheed, Rockyview General, and South Health Campus.

What happens after an IR procedure?

In most cases, your procedure will require only minimal stay at the hospital, if at all. You should start to feel better after a week. Pain resulting from the procedure will typically diminish within two to three days. For embolization procedures, the area of concern is slowly deprived of its blood supply, so it may take up to six months for you to see the full benefit. You may resume your normal daily activities, although heavy lifting, strenuous exercise, and smoking should be avoided for at least 24 hours. You may feel tired for up to a week following the procedure, but should be able to return to work after a week.